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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain

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According to Tom Sawyer, why must Jim's escape be so elaborate?
Huckleberry Finn Thesis Statements and Essay Topics
by Mark Twain

Huck's vague, past home life is solidified by Pap's constant verbal threats, and Pap warns Huck that he will physically abuse him if he tries to "put on considerble many frills. For Huck, the drunken rantings of Pap are neither astonishing nor cruel; they simply exist as a facet of his life, and Huck reports the threats with a tone of indifference and detachment.

Under the abusive eye of Pap, Huck attempts to romanticize a life free from the intrusions of a judgmental society and constrictive civilization. Away from the enforced rules of school and town, Huck is "free" to exist and absorb Pap's life of liquor and theft. But after Pap gets "too handy with his hick'ry," Huck decides to escape. The ensuing passages portray another comical, slapstick version of Pap, cursing against a "gov'ment" that would take his only son away and condemning a nation that would allow a "nigger" to vote.

Beneath Pap's farcical ramblings, however, is the reality that Huck has, indeed, been constantly beaten and left alone for days, locked in the cabin. The reality of Huck's existence under Pap, then, is one where the presence of Pap's fist and racism pervade — where Huck is "all over welts" and subject to the venom Pap has for all of society.

Pap's role as an abusive parental figure is disturbing but vitally important to the novel, because it sets up as a direct contrast to the heroic and caring Jim.

When Huck and Jim come upon the floating frame-house in Chapter 9, they discover a dead man among the various items. After Jim looks over the body, he tells Huck to come in the house, but "doan' look at his face — it's too gashly. In Chapter the Last, Jim explains that the dead man aboard the house was Pap, and Huck realizes that Pap will not bother or abuse him ever again.

With this realization, readers now view Jim's earlier gesture as an act performed by an empathetic and caring figure, and, in this sense, Jim serves as a father figure. With Jim as his role model, Huck is able to "inherit" the admirable and worthy qualities that Jim possesses and, therefore, is able to make his later decision to free Jim.

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Are you sure you want to remove bookConfirmation and any corresponding bookmarks? According to Tom Sawyer, why must Jim's escape be so elaborate?

Everything about Jim is presented through emotions:. However, at the same time that Twain is attacking slavery, he also pushes the issue into the background for most of the novel. Thus, slavery itself is never debated by Huck and Jim. Moreover, the other slaves in the novel are noticeably minor characters. Only at the very end does Twain create the central conflict concerning slavery: Should Huck free Jim from slavery and therefore be condemned to go to hell?

In the end, he makes the decision to free Jim based solely on his own experiences and not based on what he has been taught from books.

The themes of thievery and freedom also come up in the book, in that Huck and his gang are free to whatever they want. They are on the wrong side of the law and have no one to tell them what to do.

Consequently, the themes of robbery and freedom are ones that permeate the novel. This theme can be traced throughout the rest of the book. They both resolve to steal Jim out of slavery and have the freedom to do so. In conclusion, many various themes run through this novel. Tom has an anti-slavery sentiment, which tells us what Twain thought of slavery. Also, skepticism of religion is demonstrated through all of the hysterical mockeries Twain makes of organized religion.

Additionally, the element of freedom is also encompassed, as the main characters are free to roam as they please. Accessed September 15, We will write a custom essay sample on Huckleberry Finn specifically for you. Leave your email and we will send you an example after 24 hours If you contact us after hours, we'll get back to you in 24 hours or less.

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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Themes

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Essay about Freedom Theme, in Mark Twain´s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Many novels about American literature shows several themes to create the plot of the story. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, it shows several different themes to illustrate freedom verse civilization.

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn study guide contains a biography of Mark Twain, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis of Huck Finn.

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Essay title: Theme Huckleberry Finn Essay The book Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, has many themes that appear throughout the text. One such theme is that people must live outside of society to be truly free/5(1). A summary of Themes in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

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Use CliffsNotes' The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Study Guide today to ace your next test! Get free homework help on Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: book summary, chapter summary and analysis and original text, quotes, essays, and character analysis -- courtesy of CliffsNotes. This essay will analyze the themes of religion, slavery, and democracy in the book Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. By exploring these themes that lie behind the book’s veneer, we can see how Twain had an objective when he wrote this book.