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Listening to Music While Doing Homework/Studying Lead To Better Results?

Let’s bring back the Sabbath as a radical act against the always-on economy

❶Music creates a context-dependent learning scenario Research has found that people are better at recalling information in environments resembling those in which they learned the information. I can put on a good marathon and do lots of homework admittedly not as quickly as without tv.

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While sitting down to study in the Findlay Commons I look around and notice all the different study habits between students. A study shows the most effective study habits include practicing by yourself, memory games, and going to your own quiet place.

Those ways are typically the way I study. But, when I walk around the commons I notice more people than not wearing headphones and studying. I never really understood the reasoning of listening to music while studying because it is another voice in your head that takes away the sole purpose of memorization. Since I never understood the meaning for this interesting study habit, I researched whether music leads to better results for those that listen to it.

I tried to listen to music while studying and could not focus on the task at hand. But, I found a flaw in there correlation with Mozarts Effect. I walked up to 10 different kids in the Findlay commons that were studying for a quiz or midterm and listening to music. I proceeded to ask them what genre of music they were listening to and whom.

Another study done also proves that listening to music can effect studying. But, the studying must be an organizational related study. The music genre does not matter, the sound effects the performance in itself. The studies shown prove that music can be both beneficial and digressive. Differentiating between the type of study someone is engaged in plays a key factor. There is no better way to study but your own because different study habits make one more comfortable in comparison to others.

This study shows that I should not be so quick to judge other students and how they study because maybe they find it beneficial. Some people succeed when put in specific scenarios, and one scenario I will never find useful is music during study hours, but people are different and results vary.

While studying, some people prefer to listen to music. Others need total silence, it just depends on who you are and what helps you study. The reason why some people need to listen to music is to either crete a background noise, or to relax them and lower stress levels. It has been proven that stress levels are decreased by music. The student could possibly be stressed out over what he or she is studying for, and the music would bring that stress level back down.

The music just creates this calm throughout their body and enables them to concentrate extremely hard on what they are doing. Aside from making them feel better, the music will block out excess noise in the room from other students whispering to each other or the rustling of papers. These are all the positive effects music should have on studying. There is no way it can harm the others around them, who are probably too focused with their own work to notice them anyway.

Earlier in the blog period, I created a similar blog asking the same question. This is a topic that generally interests me as I alway do my homework with music playing in the background.

However, I always want to make sure that I am working in an efficient manner. We seem to have two attention systems: The unconscious one is simpler, more fundamental, and linked to emotional processing rather than higher reasoning. It also operates faster. Have you ever worked in an open-plan office and been working on a very important task, only to be driven slowly mad by a co-worker constantly sniffing, or sipping their coffee, or clipping their nails?

Music is a very useful tool in such situations. A lot of companies have tried using pink noise pdf — a less invasive version of white noise — broadcasting it around the workplace to reduce distractions and boost productivity. But views on the effectiveness of this approach are mixed at best.

It seems clear that the type of noise, or music, is important. This may seem obvious: While the nature and style of the music can cause specific responses in the brain funky music compels you to dance, sad music makes you melancholy , motivational music makes you want to keep fit , some studies suggest that it really is down to personal preference.

Given the extreme variation in musical preferences from person to person, exposing your workforce or classroom to a single type of music would obviously end up with mixed results. Music also has a big impact on mood — truly bleak music could sap your enthusiasm for your task. Something else to look out for is music with catchy lyrics. Musical pieces without wordsmight be better working companions, as human speech and vocalisation is something our brains pay particular attention to.

Some people argue that one of the best music genres for concentration is the video game soundtrack. This makes sense, when you consider the purpose of the video game music: Limitations in the technology used for early games consoles meant the music also tended to be fairly simplistic in its melodies — think Tetris or Mario. In a somewhat Darwinian way, the music in video games has been refined over decades to be pleasant, entertaining, but not distracting. The composers have probably unintentionally been manipulating the attention systems in the brains of players for years now.

There are signs that, as technology progresses, this type of theme music is being abandoned, with games producers opting for anything from big orchestral pieces to hip-hop.

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Students frequently listen to music while studying to make the process less painful and, in some cases, because they believe music will help them learn. The effects of listening to music while studying are mixed, however, and depend upon the type of music you listen to as well as the degree to which it distracts you.

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Many students feel that listening to music while doing homework will help them work more efficiently. Unfortunately, music is a major distraction, especially music that contains lyrics. While doing homework and listening to music, not only is your brain trying to comprehend the words you're seeing, but also the words you're hearing.

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But music that’s too loud or with too much of an upbeat tempo can also be distracting, so having a playlist or specific artist you turn to for studying music can really help. If you’re the type of person who has more difficulty multitasking and is easily distracted, listening to music while studying may just cause your attention to drift to the music rather than . So should you listen to music while you study or do homework? Unfortunately, the answer I have to give you is “it depends!” It seems like in general, music with vocals is distracting, while instrumental music might actually help your performance.

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One expert, Alexander Pantelyat, an assistant professor of neurology and the co-founder and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine, sounds off on music’s relationship to language—and whether background music can help you focus on . 8 thoughts on “ Listening to Music While Doing Homework/Studying Lead To Better Results? Stephen B Caruso October 23, at am. While studying, some people prefer to listen to music. Others need total silence, it just depends on who you are and what helps you study.